Talencio’s Complete Guide to the Job Search Series: Part Four

As we enter 2020, the market is strong for those looking for a new job.  The U.S. unemployment rate is at a 50 year low and the health technology sector is strong and growing. We put together these job search tips & best practices for 2020 to help you have your most successful decade yet.

This is our fourth blog in our Talencio’s Complete Guide to the Job Search series.  Previously we shared the importance of leveraging your skills and talent, identifying what you are looking for and cultivating your job search strategy.  In our last blog, we discussed the creation of your job search strategy, including the financial and marketing aspects of your search.  In this blog, we will focus on job search tips for selling yourself, leveraging research and delivering on your value.  Whether you are an executive or new professional, you will find valuable best practices in this series to aid in your job search, evaluate your current job, or prepare for an upcoming search.

First, let’s review how Andrew Bellay defines a strategy:

the process of creating a set of well-aligned activities with the aim of occupying a valuable position within a competitive landscape.

Your job search will be a process and to succeed, define a clear set of aligned activities.  You are looking for that ideal job, or as Andrew Bellay defines it, “a valuable position”.

Our last blog discussed the importance of a financial strategy.  Create a plan, especially if you are in transition, to ensure your finances align with your expectations for how long it may take to land a new job.  We also shared the importance of developing a marketing plan and executing it.  To learn more about these two strategies as they relate to landing a new job, read that blog here.

Once you have your financial and marketing strategies defined, focus on your sales strategy.  How you show up, what you say and what you do, have a dramatic impact on how you are perceived.  Most of us have not grown up as sales experts but many of the skills can be learned and applied to your job search.  There are hundreds of books and thousands of articles on successful selling and I suggest reading a few every year.  For the purposes of your personal sales strategy, we will keep it relatively simple with these three job search tips:

  1. First, keep in mind that your customer or future employer could be anyone with whom you communicate.  When engaging with others, seek first to understand them and their needs. 
  2. Then, tailor the conversation to that need.  Share new relevant information or teach them something they may not know but could be helpful with their particular need.  Provide value.
  3. Finally, as you develop the relationship, begin to take control and discuss how you can help them long term.  In other words, articulate the return on investment that company or person could realize by working with you.

These three steps are further articulated in the book, The Challenger Sale.  In general, put yourself in a sales person’s mindset every time you interact with others and nurture the relationship.

Another job search strategy is to research every person and company with whom you are meeting, in advance.  Use LinkedIn, company websites, Facebook, personal connections and others.  Make sure you are prepared for each interaction.

Another way that I like to use research in a job search is to find relevant companies.  For example, if you are looking for medical device companies in Minneapolis, you could look at the membership list for the Medical Alley Association.  The California Life Sciences Association also has a public membership list and there are many more similar organizations throughout the U.S.  Once you find a company, you can conduct a LinkedIn search to find individual professionals with whom you would like to connect with on LinkedIn or even in person.

When requesting an in-person meeting with someone you do not know well or perhaps do not know at all, ask to meet for coffee to share market insights.  This way you are not appearing needy.  After your meeting, follow up.  Summarize insights, provide additional connections for networking and follow up on any promises.  Set a personal task to reach out in several months and nourish your new connection.

Finally, when you land, ensure you deliver on the value you promised to your employer.  In fact, aim to over-deliver.  Continue to enrich your reputation and value within the industry.  This is a solid strategy to ensure future employment.

In our next blog, guest writer, Carol Kaemmerer, contributes with her post, “Why do I need a LinkedIn profile?”  This blog will help you to leverage your LinkedIn profile in your job search.

Talencio has been the preferred provider of vetted, accomplished professionals to the Health Technology Community for over 11 years. To learn how other companies have partnered with Talencio, tap into our skilled professional talent pool, or learn about career opportunities, contact us at 612.703.4236 or by email.

Written by: Paula Norbom

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